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Nutrient - Water - Group Talk - Week Commencing 17th April 2023.


There are many possibilities when it comes to what to drink, but water is the leading choice. A 250ml glass of water provides;

  • 0 Calories

  • 0g Protein

  • 0g Carbohydrates

  • 0g Fat

Water is an outstanding source of hydration and may contain numberous minerals including;

  • Calcium

  • Fluoride

  • Iron

  • Potassium

  • Sodium (Information from USDA)

Water is essential for good health and well-being and we should drink 6 to 8 glasses per day.

(6 x 250ml or 8 x 200ml)

However this is dependant on many factors, including your health, how active you are and where you live i.e. climate. There is no set rule, knowing your body and its needs for fluid will be dependant of each individual.


Water accounts for approximately 60% of an adults body weight, our bodies depend on water to survive. Every cell, tissue and organ in your body needs water to work properly.


  • Gets rid of waste through urination, perspiration and bowel movements.

  • Keeps your temperature normal

  • Lubricates and cushions joint's

  • Protects sensitive tissues

Lack of water can lead to dehydration


We can drink alternatives to water for our fluid intake;

  • Tea

  • Coffee

  • Fruit Juices

  • Squash

  • Milk

To prevent dehydration and to make sure our bodies have the fluids it requires, drink regularly is important;

  • with each meal and in-between meals

  • before, during and after exercise

  • If you feel thirsty

You know if you are reaching the correct fluid intake if you rarely feel thirsty and if your urine is colourless/pale yellow.


Drinking enough also improves our digestion as water is important to the fuctioning of our gastrointestinal tract; the stomach needs water to create digestive secretions. Insufficient hydration can also cause constipation.


Signs of mild dehydration (2% deficit)

  • fatigue

  • headache

  • confusion or short-term memory loss

  • Mood changes (irritability/depression)

Signs of long term dehydration (Medical conditions)

  • UTI

  • Kidney Stones

  • Gallstones

  • Constipation

Drinking to much is rarely a concern for healthy, well-nourished adults. This occasionally happens within athletes when they are attempting to prevent dehydration during long or intense activities, and when this happens the sodium content of our blood becomes diluted, this is called hyponatremia and it can be life-threatening.


Drinking plenty of water/fluids each day will ensure you get enough water/fluids for essential body functions.


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